can I add achievements for DA2 as well because of reasons

captainallegra:

Mirror Mirror - Went back to the Mirror of Transformation at LEAST 5 times.

Oh Na Na (What’s My Name?) - Frantically searched baby naming sites because you used all the good ones during DA:O

Friendship is Magic - Selectively brought people around until you locked in friendship with everyone

Well This is Awkward - Politely turned down Anders

I DIDN’T MEAN TO - Reloaded so that you wouldn’t kill Merrill’s clan

You Tried Star - Tried to romance someone else but then your fave

Eyyyyyyy - Finagled it so you could have sex with Isabela, Fenris, Anders, AND Merrill

Fuck This I Quit - Grudgingly picked a side at the end of the game despite wanting to strangle everyone

MUHRDUHR - Spoke along during Sebastian’s Greatest Lines

Apostitutes! - Spoke along during Isabela’s Greatest Lines

Storyteller - Let’s face it, you know most of the banter by heart, you could dub this game

Cool Story Bro - Continuously earned rivalry points with Carver despite trying REALLY HARD TO PLEASE HIM

What Do You Mean I Can’t Save Her - Completed “All That Remains”

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housebuiltbyghosts:

professorpher:

ashlingtumbls:

La La La

YUP

not quite but

housebuiltbyghosts:

professorpher:

ashlingtumbls:

La La La

YUP

not quite but

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xfreischutz:

i haven’t posted art in ages it feels like so

xfreischutz:

i haven’t posted art in ages it feels like so

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jawesomesauce said: Where do your covers come from? The images/models themselves, not the concept?

courtneymilan:

Stock photos of women wearing wedding dresses plus photoshop the Gimp.

For instance, this is the photo that was the basis for the cover of The Duchess War.

Photoshop in more dress.

image

image

Color it all.

image

Add background, text, a little bit of shading, and a few other things here and there, and voila.

image

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Saoirse Ronan - Wonderland Magazine - September 2014Photographed by Stefan Khoo

Saoirse Ronan - Wonderland Magazine - September 2014
Photographed by Stefan Khoo

(Source: sylviagetyourheadouttheoven)

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pascalcampion:

The right  spot

pascalcampion:

The right  spot

Cite Arrow reblogged from pascalcampion
art-of-swords:

Why a sword feels right
by Randy McCall
Many readers will have had the experience of shopping for modern, practical cutting swords, both replicas of ancient swords and modern designs. One of the most common tips given to new sword-shoppers is to pick up and try out many different swords “until you find one that feels right for you”. Rarely is any explanation given for precisely what this means.
Shoppers presume it has something to do with whether the hilt is the right size for their hand, or that it has something to do with the sword’s “balance”… whatever that is.
Some lucky few will have had the chance to handle high quality antique weapons.  Those who have are often shocked that these blades — often of the same weight and length as the modern replica blade they use at home — have a completely different “feel”.
Often master blades seem lighter than than their actual weight, with a sense of “liveliness” (easy to rotate in the hand), and with the feeling to make almost effortless cuts or thrusts. This isn’t to criticize the sword makers of today — there are master swordsmiths around the world — but to demonstrate the skill and genius of the weapon makers of old.
The basic question then is why is there a difference between how these swords feel, and how can a sword practitioner use this knowledge to their advantage? There have been a number of papers, articles and discussion threads on this topic, often delving into physics formula to define and explain mathematically how and why a sword feels, moves and strikes as it does.
One of the main resources for this will be “Dynamics of Hand-Held Impact Weapons” by George Turner; a fairly technical exploration of the physics behind why swords handle as they do (and an indispensable resource for those interested in designing good swords). There are also several other articles, plus web forum discussion threads, which explore this area which we’ll draw on.
Never fear though; we’ll leave the calculations behind and focus on the practical applications. Those who wish to see the maths can check the links in the Sources section.
So, let’s start off with a few basics. We’ll presume that the swords you’re looking at are well designed, have properly sized hilt grips, etc., so we can ignore the ergonomic factors.
A sword has several physical characteristics which can affect both its feel in the hand and how it handles. Let’s take a look at these, along with examples of how you would check these while inspecting your blade…
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Art of Cutting

art-of-swords:

Why a sword feels right

  • by Randy McCall

Many readers will have had the experience of shopping for modern, practical cutting swords, both replicas of ancient swords and modern designs. One of the most common tips given to new sword-shoppers is to pick up and try out many different swords “until you find one that feels right for you”. Rarely is any explanation given for precisely what this means.

Shoppers presume it has something to do with whether the hilt is the right size for their hand, or that it has something to do with the sword’s “balance”… whatever that is.

Some lucky few will have had the chance to handle high quality antique weapons.  Those who have are often shocked that these blades — often of the same weight and length as the modern replica blade they use at home — have a completely different “feel”.

Often master blades seem lighter than than their actual weight, with a sense of “liveliness” (easy to rotate in the hand), and with the feeling to make almost effortless cuts or thrusts. This isn’t to criticize the sword makers of today — there are master swordsmiths around the world — but to demonstrate the skill and genius of the weapon makers of old.

The basic question then is why is there a difference between how these swords feel, and how can a sword practitioner use this knowledge to their advantage? There have been a number of papers, articles and discussion threads on this topic, often delving into physics formula to define and explain mathematically how and why a sword feels, moves and strikes as it does.

One of the main resources for this will be “Dynamics of Hand-Held Impact Weapons” by George Turner; a fairly technical exploration of the physics behind why swords handle as they do (and an indispensable resource for those interested in designing good swords). There are also several other articles, plus web forum discussion threads, which explore this area which we’ll draw on.

Never fear though; we’ll leave the calculations behind and focus on the practical applications. Those who wish to see the maths can check the links in the Sources section.

So, let’s start off with a few basics. We’ll presume that the swords you’re looking at are well designed, have properly sized hilt grips, etc., so we can ignore the ergonomic factors.

A sword has several physical characteristics which can affect both its feel in the hand and how it handles. Let’s take a look at these, along with examples of how you would check these while inspecting your blade…

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Art of Cutting

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ot3 + touch

(Source: alittlemorethanateam)

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spesiria:

DA:I - Tarot Cards

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theminttu:

Iron Bull more like

Iron Bara

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everythingscenic:

Designer Spotlight: Michael Levine

1. Parsifal (Met Opera)

2. Candide (English National Opera)

3. Rusalka (Paris Opera)

4. Walkure (Canadian Opera Company)

5. Eugene Onegin (Lyric Opera)

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batcii:


Anonymous said: u should totally draw some poc!hermione bein cute man. like readin in her books or tryin 2 tame her wild hair or having to put up with ron and harry.

hermione bein cute and multitasking while she gets dressed or s/t woo

batcii:

Anonymous said: u should totally draw some poc!hermione bein cute man. like readin in her books or tryin 2 tame her wild hair or having to put up with ron and harry.

hermione bein cute and multitasking while she gets dressed or s/t woo

Cite Arrow reblogged from bloodlutz
reminder for bisexuals

lyricalred:

today is bi visibility day. as such, bisexual people will be completely visible for the next 24 hours. this is a bad day to engage in bank heists, ghost impersonations, covert operations for vague yet menacing government agencies, and other common bisexual hobbies that rely upon our powers of invisibility. 

reblog to save a life. 

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headfullofgold:

autobibliography:

There may come a day, as I say, when you have cause to sing this song. I hope that that day never comes. At the same time, I know that it will. Let’s not kid each other: you’re going to have a very bad relationship some day. It’s not just gonna suck—it’s gonna suck ass. You’re going to make up a little chart of all the asses that it sucks. There will be an ass chart on your bedroom wall. Your significant other will say “What is this?” and you will say, “Oh, they’re just butts. Just butts.” And she will say “The hell they are—that’s an ass chart!” Where will you be then, oh sinner?”

— John Darnielle introducing No Children at The Middle East Downstairs in Cambridge, MA, 9.26.06.

"This here is a song I want you to sing to the one you love when the time comes. You’ll know when the time has come. You won’t like it; you won’t feel like singing. I want you to remember when the time comes that I told you that singing would help. It will make you look crazy. But there’s nothing like looking crazy to give you the edge."

—John Darnielle introducing No Children at the Empty Bottle in Chicago, IL, 2.28.2004

  

Cite Arrow reblogged from thealienlives